SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS IN IL-1A RS1800587, IL-1B RS1143634 AND VITAMIN D RECEPTOR RS731236 IN STAGE III GRADE B/C PERIODONTITIS
Özturk Özener H.1, Tacal Aslan B.2, Eken B.F.2, Agrali Ö.B.1, Yildrim H.S.1, Altunok E.Ç.3, Ulucan K.2, Kuru L.1
*Corresponding Author: Assist. Prof. Dr. Hafize Öztürk Özener, Address: Marmara University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Periodontology Basıbuyuk, Maltepe, Istanbul, Turkey. Fax number: +90 216 421 02 21; E-mail: hafize.ozturk@marmara.edu.tr
page: 10

DISCUSSION

Recent evidence has shown that, with the continuous advancement of genetic engineering technology, gene polymorphism can be an important basis for the individual differences in the development and progression of periodontitis. In this study, the frequencies of IL-1A (rs1800587), IL-1B (rs1143634) and VDR (rs731236) gene polymorphisms were evaluated for the first time in Stage III Grade B/C periodontitis patients in comparison with periodontally healthy individuals. Among different genotyping methods, Real-time PCR that could rapidly and simultaneously detect SNPs was preferred in this study. SNPs from the promoter region, which play an essential role the transcriptional regulation in the coding region, can affect the expression of a gene. The genes in IL-1 family possess allele polymorphisms in which SNP -889C/T (rs1800587) in IL-1A gene and SNP +3654 (rs1143634) in IL-1B gene are researched extensively. Our findings revealed that the genotypic distributions of IL-1A (rs1800587) and IL-1B (rs1143634) gene polymorphisms are not associated with Stage III periodontitis. These results are consistent with the previous studies reporting no relationship between SNPs rs1800587 or rs1143634 and neither chronic nor aggressive periodontitis [8,27-33]. On the other hand, contradictory findings were published declaring significant associations between either of the two SNPs and periodontal diseases [29, 34-39]. Majumder et al. [40] and Wagner et al. [41] concluded that IL-1A (rs1800587) polymorphism was related to the susceptibility of chronic periodontitis. Recently, a meta-analysis of ethnicity assessment revealed that IL-1A (rs1800587) gene polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of chronic periodontitis in Europeans, US Americans and Africans, but not in Algerians and Mexicans [42]. The results of the present study displayed T allele for IL-1B (rs1143634) to be associated with the periodontitis patients, while the C allele was associated with the healthy individuals. Similarly, T allele in IL-1B (+3954C/T) was linked to high risk of periodontal disease in Asians, Caucasians, and in mixed populations, however not in Africans [14]. Considering that these differences may be related to the population, the literature contains no data on the Turkish population regarding IL-1A (-889C/T) and only 2 research studies have been published about IL-1B (+3954C/T). Yücel et al. [43] stated that the distribution of allele and genotype frequencies for IL-1B (+3954C/T) were similar among chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis and healthy control groups. On the other hand, our result was contrary to the results of Güzeldemir et al. [37] who show that susceptibility to localized aggressive periodontitis is increased by homozygosity for allele 1 of rs1143634 which referred to (C→T) at position +3954 in the fifth exon of the IL-1B gene. In the new classification, localized aggressive periodontitis may refer to the Stage III or IV and Grade C. It is thought that different outcomes can be obtained depending on the size (31 healthy subjects and 31 localized aggressive periodontitis patients) and the different status of the patients based on the new classification of periodontal diseases. The VDR, a ligand-controlled transcription factor, intervenes the actions of the vitamin D hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to alter bone mineral homeostasis. VDR TaqI gene polymorphism is positioned at exon 9. The current study demonstrated that increased TT genotype and T allele of the VDR TaqI polymorphism in healthy subjects were associated with the decreased risk of periodontitis. Similar to the present study, De Brito et al. [19] reported that the patients with any form of C (formerly t) allele (Tt or tt genotypes) were 2.4 times more susceptible to chronic periodontitis than the patients who lacked C allele. However, Gunes et al. [44] contradicted this finding and suggested that TaqI polymorphisms of the VDR gene were not associated with severe generalized chronic periodontitis in the Turkish population studied. In two meta-analyses published in 2011 [21] and 2012 [22], no association was observed in the Caucasian population, while chronic, but not aggressive, periodontitis cases, in patients among the Asian population were reported to have a weak, significantly higher frequency of the TT genotype and T allele of TaqI. The findings of a recently published meta-analysis, in contrast with the above meta-analyses, reveal a link between periodontitis susceptibility and the VDR TaqI polymorphism in Caucasian patients under the dominant model without any apparent correlation in Asian participants [45]. The frequency TaqI alleles may vary among different populations. It has been shown that the T allele frequency of the VDR TaqI polymorphism is lowest among Asians, about of the 8% population, and highest in Caucasians, at 43% [46]. The genetic susceptibility of a subject to periodontitis due to polymorphism might change on account of the ethnicity of the population. Genetic factors are of great importance in identifying the hostís immune response to infection and could account for significant variation in the severity, distribution, and extension of the disease [47-49]. The grade of periodontitis is predicted by direct or indirect evidence of the progression rate of in three levels: Grade A (slow progression), Grade B (moderate progression) and Grade C (rapid progression) [2]. With the given facts, the present study investigated whether SNPs rs1800587, rs1143634 and rs731236 might be related with the progression of periodontal disease in a group of the Turkish population. In our study, healthy individuals and Grade B and Grade C Stage III periodontitis patients were evaluated and compared. T allele of the rs1143634 was linked to patients having Grade B Stage III periodontitis. Our finding was in accordance with da Silva et al. [14], who revealed that T allele of the rs1143634 was related with an increased risk of periodontal disease in Asians, Caucasians and in a mixed population. The outcome of the present study demonstrated that rs731236 (TaqI) polymorphism is significantly associated with Grade B Stage III periodontitis, but not Grade C, in comparison with healthy individuals. In the assessment of associations between the grading of periodontitis and gene polymorphism, TaqI polymorphism CT genotype is higher in Grade B periodontitis patients. In a research study conducted by Chantarangsu et al. [50], with a homogeneous Thai population, the VDR gene polymorphism was examined according to the severity of chronic periodontitis (no/mild, moderate and severe). The study revealed that there is no relationship between TaqI and periodontitis. To the authorsí knowledge, this is the first study evaluating susceptibility to periodontitis according to Grade and Stage approach in the classification of periodontitis. A limitation of our study may be the absence of other stages or grades of periodontitis.



Number 25
VOL. 25(2), 2022
Number 25
VOL. 25 (1), 2022
Number 24
VOL. 24(2), 2021
Number 24
VOL. 24(1), 2021
Number 23
VOL. 23(2), 2020
Number 22
VOL. 22(2), 2019
Number 22
VOL. 22(1), 2019
Number 22
VOL. 22, 2019 Supplement
Number 21
VOL. 21(2), 2018
Number 21
VOL. 21 (1), 2018
Number 21
VOL. 21, 2018 Supplement
Number 20
VOL. 20 (2), 2017
Number 20
VOL. 20 (1), 2017
Number 19
VOL. 19 (2), 2016
Number 19
VOL. 19 (1), 2016
Number 18
VOL. 18 (2), 2015
Number 18
VOL. 18 (1), 2015
Number 17
VOL. 17 (2), 2014
Number 17
VOL. 17 (1), 2014
Number 16
VOL. 16 (2), 2013
Number 16
VOL. 16 (1), 2013
Number 15
VOL. 15 (2), 2012
Number 15
VOL. 15, 2012 Supplement
Number 15
Vol. 15 (1), 2012
Number 14
14 - Vol. 14 (2), 2011
Number 14
The 9th Balkan Congress of Medical Genetics
Number 14
14 - Vol. 14 (1), 2011
Number 13
Vol. 13 (2), 2010
Number 13
Vol.13 (1), 2010
Number 12
Vol.12 (2), 2009
Number 12
Vol.12 (1), 2009
Number 11
Vol.11 (2),2008
Number 11
Vol.11 (1),2008
Number 10
Vol.10 (2), 2007
Number 10
10 (1),2007
Number 9
1&2, 2006
Number 9
3&4, 2006
Number 8
1&2, 2005
Number 8
3&4, 2004
Number 7
1&2, 2004
Number 6
3&4, 2003
Number 6
1&2, 2003
Number 5
3&4, 2002
Number 5
1&2, 2002
Number 4
Vol.3 (4), 2000
Number 4
Vol.2 (4), 1999
Number 4
Vol.1 (4), 1998
Number 4
3&4, 2001
Number 4
1&2, 2001
Number 3
Vol.3 (3), 2000
Number 3
Vol.2 (3), 1999
Number 3
Vol.1 (3), 1998
Number 2
Vol.3(2), 2000
Number 2
Vol.1 (2), 1998
Number 2
Vol.2 (2), 1999
Number 1
Vol.3 (1), 2000
Number 1
Vol.2 (1), 1999
Number 1
Vol.1 (1), 1998

 

 


 About the journal ::: Editorial ::: Subscription ::: Information for authors ::: Contact
 Copyright © Balkan Journal of Medical Genetics 2006