THE LATITUDE WISE PREVALENCE OF THE CCR5-∆32-HIV RESISTANCE ALLELE IN INDIA
Bhatnagar I#, Singh M#, Mishra N, Saxena R, Thangaraj K, Singh L, Saxena SK*
*Corresponding Author: Shailendra K. Saxena, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Virology, Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CSIR), Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500007 (AP), India; Tel.: +91-40-27192630 (direct); +91-40-27160222-41, Ext. 2630; Fax: +91-40-27160591; +91-40-27160311; E-mail: shailen@ccmb.res.in ; shailen1@gmail.com
page: 17

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