PP141. THE ANGİOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME I/D GENE POLYMORPHISM IN ELITE TURKISH ATHLETES
Mehmet Gunay1, MELAHAT KURTULUS ULKUER2, Uner Ulkuer3, Kadir Gokdemir1, Meral Yirmibeş Karaoguz4, Ebru Çetin1, Ebru Alp5, Tahsin Kesici6 1. School of Physical Education and Sports, Gazi University Ankara, Turkey; 2. Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey; 3. Criminal Police Laboratory, General Directory of Security, Ankara, Turkey; 4. Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey; 5. Department of Medical Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey; 6. TOBB Economics and Technology University, Ankara, Turkey e-mail: mulkuer@gazi.edu.tr
*Corresponding Author:
page: 111

Abstract

Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) functions to convert angiotensin I to vasoactive angiotensin II and to inactivate the vasodilator bradykinin. ACE is widely distributed in cell types, including skeletal muscle and at least in heart muscle. The cloning of the ACE gene has made it possible to identify a deletion (D)-insertion (I) polymorphism. The human ACE gene is found on chromosome 17 and contains a restriction fragment length polymorphisms consisting of the presence (insertion , I) or absence (deletion, D) of a 287 base pair Alu repeat sequence in intron 16. Therefore, the ACE genes, which have been shown to be polymorphic, could be candidate genes for elite athletic ability. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in elite athletes and controls. Male and female Turkish athletes of regional or national competitive standard were recruited from the following sports: wrestlers, weightlifters, cross-country skiers and untrained control subjects (aged 15-30 yr). DNA was extracted from white blood cells or blood stain samples. The ACE genotype of all subjects was determined by PCR, yielding amplification produc ts of 490 bp (I allele) and 190 bp (D allele). These were separated by electrophoresis on a 2 % agarose gel. Allele frequencies were determined by gene counting. Genotype distribution and allele frequencies between groups of athletes and controls were then compared by exact test. This study determined frequently DD allele in elite Turkish athletes. P value of 0.01 were considered statistically significant.




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